New Mexico

Open Public Record Act:

The New Mexico Inspection of Public Records Act (IPRA) grants everyone the right to access public records of state agencies and local government entities with a few exceptions. If you have a complaint regarding potential Inspection of Public Records Act violations, you will need to submit it in writing to the Records Custodian of the Office of the Governor.

Birth Records:

In New Mexico, birth records are restricted access records until 100 years after the date of birth. Only those who are immediate family members of the registrant or those who represent tangible proof of legal interest may obtain copies of birth records.

The New Mexico Vital Records office can issue certified copies of birth records. You may submit your request by mail. You will need to submit a completed application form or send a letter with the following information:

  • The birth name of the person on the certificate.
  • The date of birth.
  • The city of birth including the county if known.
  • The mother’s full maiden name.
  • The father’s full name.
  • Requestor’s relationship to the person on the birth certificate.
  • The purpose for which you are requesting the birth certificate.
  • Your name and signature.
  • Your mailing address.
  • You will also need to include the fee which is $10. Only a certified check or money order made payable to “New Mexico Vital Records” will be accepted.

    You may also submit a request online or by phone through the third party vendor, VitalChek, or in person by visiting the Bureau of Vital Records & Health Statistics or the Public Health Offices in Midtown or Socorro.

    Death Records:

    Death records in New Mexico are restricted access records. Only those who are immediate family members of the deceased or those who represent tangible proof of legal interest in the record will be allowed to obtain a death certificate. Death records that date 50 years after the date of death are considered public records.

    To request a death certificate, you may order one online or by phone through a third party vendor, VitalChek. You can also request one by mail. You will need to submit a completed application form or a letter containing detailed information listed on the record (name, date of death, location of death, etc.) as well as your purpose and relationship to the deceased. You will also need to include a non-refundable $5 fee per certified copy (check or money order only). You can also request for a certified copy in person at the Bureau of Vital Records & Health Statistics office in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Missing People:

    The New Mexico Department of Public Safety (DPS) maintains a website that serves as the clearinghouse for all missing persons reported in the state. You can use the website to search by name, city, or the entire state for missing person cases.

    Elected Officials:

    You can get to know your elected officials by visiting the official state website of New Mexico. The links to the various web pages or websites of the officials are also provided. For example, you can click on the link to Governor Susana Martinez’s website if you wish to learn more about her policies and contact information.

    Court Records

    no links in this area

    Recorder

    no links in this area