Open Public Record Act:

In the state of Alaska, public records of all branches of government are accessible to the public upon request. Requests can be submitted in any form and must be responded to within 10 business days of submission. The Alaska Public Records Act allows even non-residents to file requests. Fees may be required, depending on the public agency.

There are, however, explicit exemptions to this law. These include vital statistics, adoption proceedings, juvenile records, medical and related public health records, and certain law enforcement records such as active investigations, records that would interfere with trials, records on confidential informants, and records that would endanger the life or safety of an individual.

Birth Records:

You can request birth certificates of births that occurred in Alaska from the Division of Public Health which has offices in Juneau and Anchorage.

Only certain individuals may request copies of a birth certificate. These are the person named in the birth certificate, the parents of the child’s birth certificate, a legal guardian, a legal representative, and a person who provides documentation showing the birth certificate is needed for the determination of property rights. Legal guardians will be required to submit a certified copy of the guardianship papers while legal representatives are required to present a letter stating whom he/she is representing and how they are related.

Requests must be made by filling out the request form and providing a copy of a government-issued ID of the person making the request. The acceptable IDs include a driver’s license, military ID, veteran’s ID, and unexpired US or foreign passport.

Requests submitted via mail will be processed within 4 to 6 weeks upon receipt by the Bureau. Heirloom requests are processed within 6-8 weeks after receipt. Requests submitted in person can be processed while you wait. If you wish to request for expedited service, you will need to mark the request form for expedited service then fax it to the office. A fee of $11 will be required. The time frame for expedited requests is within three business days.

The cost of a certified copy of a birth certificate is $30 with each additional copy costing $25. An heirloom certificate costs $55 and each additional copy costs $50. If a record is not found, the fee you paid will become a search fee and a statement of search document will be mailed. If you require an Apostille with your birth certificate, you will need to pay an extra charge of $12 for the first copy and $2 for each additional copy of the same record.

Marriage Records:

Copies of marriage certificates can be obtained from the Division of Public Health, a division of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. Only the bride, groom, or spouse may obtain certified copies of their own marriage certificates. Legal representatives are allowed provided that they are able to present a certified copy of the legal document when they make their request. Only marriages that occurred in Alaska are filed in this office. Take note that the completed marriage license will need to be mailed to the Juneau Field Office and registered before a certified copy can be provided.

All requests must include the full first, middle, and last names of the individuals listed on the certificate. A copy of a government-issued picture ID of the person submitting the request will also be required by the Bureau. The acceptable forms of ID include a driver’s license, official identification card issued by another US state, an unexpired US or foreign passport, US military ID, and a BIA or tribal identification card.

Requests can be submitted in person, through mail, or via fax. A fee of $30 will be charged for the first copy of a certificate. Additional copies will cost $25 each if ordered at the same time. Heirloom certificates cost $65 while extra copies cost $60. For records requiring an Apostille, you will be charged an additional $12 for the first record and $2 for each additional copy.

The processing time for these requests is 4-6 weeks upon receipt of the request. Heirloom requests can take up to 6-8 weeks after the request was received. Expedited service will cost an additional $11. Expedited requests are usually processed within three business days.

Divorce Records:

Divorce records are filed in the Division of Public Health, a division of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. You can obtain a copy of a divorce certificate provided you are the husband or wife listed on the record. You can also obtain a copy as a legal representative provided you were able to submit a certified copy of the legal document when you made the request. Only divorces filed in Alaska can be processed in this office.

All completed request forms must be accompanied by a copy of a government-issued ID of the person making the request. The acceptable forms of ID include a driver’s license, military ID, US or foreign passport, and BIA or tribal identification card.

Requests can be submitted in person in the Anchorage or Juneau offices. You can also opt to mail the form or fax it to the office. Processing time for a divorce certificate is within 4-6 weeks after the request was received. Expedited service will cost an additional $11 but it will shorten the processing time to within three business days.

The cost of a divorce certificate is $30 for the first copy and $25 for each additional copy. If you require an Apostille, you will need to pay an additional $12 for the first record and $2 for each additional copy of the same record.

Death Records:

Death records are housed in the offices of the Division of Public Health. A spouse, parent, child, or sibling of a deceased person can request for a copy of the death certificate provided you are able to show proof of your relation to the deceased. Legal representatives may also request for a copy of a death certificate as long as they can provide documentation showing that the death certificate is required to determine property rights. He/she must also present a letter stating who he/she is representing and how they are related to the person named on the record. Only deaths that occurred in Alaska can be processed by this office.

To submit a request, you must complete the application form and present a copy of a government-issued picture ID. This can be a driver’s license, a US or foreign passport, US military ID, or tribal identification card with photo. Requests can be submitted in person at the Juneau or Anchorage office. They can also be mailed or faxed to the office. Requests submitted via mail will normally be processed within 4-6 weeks after receipt. If you wish for expedited service (within three business days), you can pay an additional $11 fee.

A copy of a death certificate costs $30 and additional copies cost $25 each. If you require an Apostille, you will need to pay an additional $12 for the first record and $2 for each additional copy.

Missing People:

All missing person cases reported in the state of Alaska are filed in the Missing Persons Clearinghouse (MPC) which falls under the AST Director’s Office. This center manages both hard copy files and computer assisted programs that help centralize missing persons information.

The public can view active missing persons bulletins through the MPC website. Each file contains the name of the individual, photo, date of birth, age, height, weight, hair color, eye color, and scars/marks/tattoos. It also contains any information regarding the person’s disappearance and contact information of the law enforcement agency handling the case.

Elected Officials:

You can view information on all elected officials in the state of Alaska through the office of the Alaska Division of Elections. This includes Alaska’s Governors, State Senators, House of Representatives, and even the school board members of the Regional Educational Attendance Area.

The information provided through this office include the contact information, party, biography, committee membership, and legislative bill sponsorship. For example, current Senate President Senator Pete Kelly is shown to have been in legislative service since 2013 and a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee as well as the Senate Judiciary, to name a few.

Public Records

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Court Records

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Recorder

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